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Tobacco Free Seminole Partnership Raises Awareness on the Dangers of Tobacco

By Tiffani McDaniel

May 31, 2016

May 31, 2016

Tobacco Free Seminole Partnership Raises Awareness on the Dangers of Tobacco

World No Tobacco Day is May 31

Contact: Tiffani McDaniel
Media Desk: 407-665-3374 (office) and 321-200-7805 (cell)

Sanford, Fla. – The Florida Department of Health’s Tobacco Free Florida program and Tobacco Free Seminole Partnership are celebrating World No Tobacco Day by highlighting the significant progress made in the fight against tobacco and raising awareness on the many dangers of tobacco use.

Each year, the public health community observes World No Tobacco Day on May 31 to focus on the health risks associated with tobacco use and protect future generations by reducing tobacco consumption.

“Smoking kills more people than alcohol, AIDS, car crashes, illegal drugs, murders, and suicides combined — and thousands more die from other tobacco-related causes — such as fires and smokeless tobacco use,” said Dr. Swannie Jett, Health Officer for DOH-Seminole. “Yet, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly one in six American adults currently smoke cigarettes, a habit that has been found to reduce life expectancy by an average of 14.5 years for women and 13.2 years for men.”

Despite the approximately 1,300 deaths in the U.S. caused by smoking every day, cigarette smoking in Florida has continued to decline among adults and teens. The cigarette smoking rate among Florida adults has decreased by 8.8 percent – from 19.3 percent in 2011 to 17.6 percent in 2014. Cigarette smoking among Florida high school students dropped from 11.9 percent in 2011 to 6.9 percent in 2015, one of the lowest high school cigarette smoking rates in the country.

“Florida has made great strides in the fight against tobacco,” said Tobacco Free Florida Bureau Chief Valerie Lacy. “While I am encouraged by the progress made statewide and right here in Seminole County, there is still more work to be done to continue to reduce tobacco consumption and protect future generations.”

Tobacco has killed more than 20 million people prematurely since the first Surgeon General’s report in 1964 and still today, smoking remains the leading preventable cause of disease and death in the U.S. Floridians who want to quit any form of tobacco have access to Tobacco Free Florida’s FREE and proven-effective resources. Visit tobaccofreeflorida.com to learn more.

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